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from the group: Ambrotype

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Pre-photographic

Photomechanical

Photographic

Carbon
Silver Gelatin DOP
Chromogenic Color
Dye Imbibition
Instant
Silver Dye Bleach
Albumen
Salted Paper
Gelatin POP
Collodion POP
Matte Collodion
Cyanotype
Platinum
Tintype
Chromogenic Color Slide Film
Carbro
Ambrotype
Screen Plate
Gelatin Dry Plate
Direct Carbon (Fresson)

Digital

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Notes on this view:

In 1854, American photographer and inventor James Ambrose Cutting developed a method for adhering two pieces of glass together using Canada balsam (resin). Though meant as a way to hermetically seal the ambrotypes as a preservation method, the process was ultimately unnecessary as the varnish layer itself worked extremely well as a protectant. In fact, ambrotypes that utilized Cutting's patent are known to exhibit deterioration caused by the technique, as seen in the yellowish-green hue of this image. Interestingly, Cutting's lasting contribution to the ambrotype was his naming of the process, which was taken from the Greek word meaning "imperishable" and suggested to him by fellow photographer Marcus A. Root. Cutting changed his middle name to Ambrose in honor of the process later in his life.